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The Umbrella Organisation

The Umbrella Organisation

May the power of the brolly live on!

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Britz, Amazon
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rakspatel wrote in mycroft_brolly


Britz is available to buy on Amazon for £6.07 here:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Britz-DVD-Riz-Ahmed/dp/B000WM9WPK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1324396154&sr=8-1

Cut and pasted from the Amazon website:

Britz is a gritty and unflinching two-part contemporary thriller from award-winning writer and director, Peter Kosminsky. Riz Ahmed and Manjinder Virk star in the film as brother and sister Sohail and Nasima - two young, British-born Muslims who are pulled in radically different directions by their conflicting personal experiences in post 9/11 Britain.

Sohail is an ambitious law undergraduate who, eager to play a part in protecting British security, signs up with MI5. When he begins an investigation into a supposed terrorist cell the enquiry soon leads him back to his own community in Bradford, where none of the locals--not even his closest friends--are above suspicion. Unsure if he is being used by the establishment, Sohail is forced to question where his loyalties really lie: with his family and friends or with the country of his birth, Britain.

His sister Nasima, a medical student in Leeds, becomes increasingly angered by Britain's foreign and domestic policy after witnessing at first hand the relentless targeting of her Muslim neighbours and peers. When her best friend falls foul of the Government's anti-terror legislation, Nasima begins to feel even more alienated and is forced to confront her liberal views. Disillusioned by the political process, she embarks on a dangerous path that finally leads her to a terrorist training camp in North West Pakistan.

With action set in Pakistan, Eastern Europe, London and Leeds, Britz reveals a tragic sequence of events from the two very different perspectives of these young siblings. Both feature-length episodes collide in a gripping finale, which ultimately asks us to question whether the laws we think are making us safer are actually putting us in greater danger.